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There are 39 articles matching your criteria. Below are results 11 through 20.
  
Masterclass with Conrad Herwig: An Introduction to Doodle Tonguing 
Doodle tonguing, like any technique, will give you freedom, and that's all we want, control. You can stick to one system, like tunnel vision, but if we're looking ahead to the future--to what I call "twenty-first century trombone playing"--what we really need is an all-inclusive system, and doodle tonguing is a key element of that.

 

Masterclass with Dick Griffin: Multiphonics on the Trombone 
The principle behind multiphonics--producing more than one note at a time on a wind instrument--is the overtone series. You play any note for the tonic and sing any interval above. The combination of the two notes produces overtones. You're not actually playing those notes, they're just coming out of the combination of the other two.

 

Masterclass with Grover Mitchell: Advice for Lead Trombonists 
The best lead players are usually very good basic players. Tone, concept and intonation are a must. You also need good technique and good range, and must know how to lead. Finally, a lead trombone player has to work with the lead trumpet and lead alto.

 

Masterclass with Steve Turre: Making Music with Shells 
Playing the shells can help you as a brass player. They take a lot of endurance and strength. In terms of building a solo, once you can tell a story in just the interval of a fourth, you see that it's not about how many notes you play. It's about what you're saying. So playing the shells also helps you conceptually.

 

Orchestral Audition Repertoire [DY] 
This resource provides a listing of orchestral excerpts most frequently asked on tenor and bass trombone orchestra auditions as well as links to online pages which contain the music and annotated comments.

 

Orchestral Excerpts for the Tenor Trombonist: Berlioz, Hungarian March 
Hungarian March has proved to be an excellent audition piece because the seemingly universal flaw of dragging at louder dynamics is quickly assessed. This excerpt tests a trombonist's ability to play with strength, character, quality of sound and volume, while moving rapidly and rhythmically through the often cumbersome mid-register.

 

Orchestral Excerpts for the Tenor Trombonist: Bolero 
There are many challenges in performing this solo. They include waiting through so many "verses" before you get to play, making a perfect "bulls-eye" entrance, using an excellent ballad legato, and maintaining accurate control as the pitches descend. Also keep in mind that this solo has long phrases which may require the performer play louder than they might like.

 

Orchestral Excerpts for the Tenor Trombonist: Brahms - Symphony No. 1 
Lewis Van Haney and I used to compare our experiences with various pieces. I remember he said that Leonard Bernstein wanted the notes in the chorale to be quite separate. Whereas, my experience with Eugene Ormandy was that he preferred a very legato interpretation. The exact meaning of the dots under the slurs has always been confusing to the trombone players. It is an indication that is more common in string writing.

 

Orchestral Excerpts for the Tenor Trombonist: La Forze del Destino 
Like almost all 19th century Italian operatic literature, Verdi's "La forza del destino" was written for valve trombone. This is the reason why we find so many technically difficult passages in this literature. Good technical control of the instrument and of the slide is therefore a prerequisite to the successful study and mastery of the parts.

 

Orchestral Excerpts for the Tenor Trombonist: Mahler Symphony No. 3 
After having studied this symphony with my teacher Professor Willy Walther, who had performed it very successfully with the Berlin Philharmonic under the late Sergiu Celibache, and having performed it more than 30 times myself, I have very strong convictions about this wonderful music. These convictions have quite naturally developed and changed over the years.

 



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